Metal Guide

Metal Guide

White Gold

With its alloy composition patented in the early 1900s, white gold is now becoming an increasingly popular choice in fine jewelry today. This diverse and versatile metal can be found everywhere including hands of British royalty and even your local jewelry store. It is silvery white color gives you the look and feel of platinum with more flexibility in your budget.

The purity of gold is measured in karats (symbol: k or kt). Pure gold (99.9% gold) is graded as 24k. Lower grades are represented proportionally; 14k gold is 58.5% gold and 41.5% alloy and 18k gold is 75% gold and 25% alloy. Gold is mixed with alloys to strengthen it as pure gold is too soft for traditional jewelry.

White gold is commonly allowed with copper, nickel, zinc and/or palladium. Unlike yellow gold, it is plated with a metal called rhodium in order to maintain the platinum like appearance. This plating can wear over time; however, it can be restored with a simple replating process.

Storage

-Securely store in non-abrasive or velvet like pouches and fabric lined jewelry boxes

-Avoid keeping multiple pieces together

Cleaning

-Using a soft brush, clean gently in warm water and mild dish soap

-Dry with a soft cloth, lint-free if possible

-Do not use metallic brushes, corrosive cleaning solutions (such bleach and chlorine), or paper towels and tissues.

Yellow Gold

Yellow gold is the perennial choice for fine jewelry. The iconic yellow color is recognized in history by all cultures fortunate enough to stumble upon its beauty. The Ancient Egyptians adorned their kings in stunning gold jewelry, Medieval artisans wove golden threads into massive silk tapestries, and Renaissance painters applied gold leaf on their masterpieces.

The purity of gold is measured in karats (symbol: k or kt). Pure gold (99.9% gold) is graded as 24k. Lower grades are represented proportionally; 14k gold is 58.5% gold and 41.5% alloy and 18k gold is 75% gold and 25% alloy. Gold is mixed with alloys to strengthen it as pure gold is too soft for traditional jewelry.

Yellow gold is commonly allowed with copper, nickel, zinc and/or cobalt. Unlike white gold, it does it need to be replated. The color of yellow gold will not fade ensuring its eternal beauty.

Storage

-Securely store in non-abrasive or velvet like pouches and fabric lined jewelry boxes

-Avoid keeping multiple pieces together

Cleaning

-Using a soft brush, clean gently in warm water and mild dish soap

-Dry with a soft cloth, lint-free if possible

-Do not use metallic brushes, corrosive cleaning solutions (such bleach and chlorine), or paper towels and tissues.

-If jewelry develops sheen, use a jewelry cleaning solution

Platinum

A name that invokes opulence and prestige, platinum is the most desired metal in the jewelry world. During the 18th century, King Louis XVI of France called it 'a metal fit for only kings.' Among many reasons to select platinum, the precious metal is also the most durable and secure ensuring your jewelry lasts for generations.

Not does only does it look luxurious, but platinum also feels luxurious, as it is noticeably heavier than other metals. You can experience the weight of the piece as soon as you put it on. Platinum jewelry is made using 90-95% platinum and 5-10% alloy. This high purity grade is preferred for individuals with metal allergies.

Platinum is produced using 10% alloy or less of iridium, palladium, ruthenium, or cobalt. As a result, the metal does not tarnish nor does it require any kind of replating.

Storage

-Securely store in non-abrasive or velvet like pouches and fabric lined jewelry boxes

-Avoid keeping multiple pieces together

Cleaning

-Using a soft brush, clean gently in warm water and mild dish soap

-Dry with a soft cloth, lint-free if possible

-Do not use metallic brushes, corrosive cleaning solutions (such bleach and chlorine), or paper towels and tissues.

Palladium

For those seeking a true platinum alternative, palladium possess all the desirable qualities found in its metallurgical counterpart at half the price. The rare metal was once used only as an alloy in making durable gold. During the 1930s, it joined the precious metals as a centerpiece in fine jewelry.

As a member of the platinum group, palladium is similar to platinum in appearance, durability, and hardness. It’s most noticeable difference is density as palladium is much lighter. Palladium jewelry is made using 90-95% palladium and 5-10% alloy. This high purity grade is preferred for individuals with metal allergies.

Palladium is produced using 10% alloy or less of iridium and ruthenium. As a result, the metal does not tarnish nor does it require any kind of replating.

Storage

-Securely store in non-abrasive or velvet like pouches and fabric lined jewelry boxes

-Avoid keeping multiple pieces together

Cleaning

-Using a soft brush, clean gently in warm water and mild dish soap

-Dry with a soft cloth, lint-free if possible

-Do not use metallic brushes, corrosive cleaning solutions (such bleach and chlorine), or paper towels and tissue.

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